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A Civil War Round Table Quiz Book


A Civil War Round Table Quiz Book


$23.86


When Missouri was admitted to the Union as a slave state, what state was admitted as a free state?President James Buchanan and one member of his cabinet were considered? doughfaces. What does this term mean’the Battle of Honey Springs was unusual in that it did not take place in either a state or an organized territory. Where did it happen? Pit your knowledge of the War Between the States against your friends? and family?s claims to expertise withA Civil War Round Table Quiz Book. The book features 117 different quizzes, the subjects ranging from the infamous Dred Scott case to the final surrender at Appomattox Court House. Each quiz has a theme, and the themes have been selected to cover myriad subjects and to lead readers into the lesser-known aspects of the war that they might not otherwise explore. The Hartford (Connecticut) Civil War Round Table even used these quizzes as a key component of their meetings. Civil War experts and general history fans alike will enjoy challenging their friends and rivals with the fun and interesting trivia found inA Civil War Round Table Quiz Book. The extensive knowledge that readers will learn from this book will amaze and befuddle even the most stalwart Civil War aficionado.

African Americans on the Great Plains


African Americans on the Great Plains


$46.02


Until recently, histories of the American West gave little evidence of the presence?let alone importance?of African Americans in the unfolding of the western frontier. There might have been a mention of Estevan, slavery, or the Dred Scott decision, but the rich and varied experience of African Americans on the Great Plains went largely unnoted. This book, the first of its kind, supplies that critical missing chapter in American history. Originally published over the span of twenty-five years in Great Plains Quarterly, the essays collected here describe the part African Americans played in the frontier army and as homesteaders, community builders, and activists. The authors address race relations, discrimination, and violence. They tell of the struggle for civil rights and against Jim Crow, and they examine African American cultural growth and contributions as well as economic and political aspects of black life on the Great Plains. From individuals such as? Pap? Singleton, Era Bell Thompson, Aaron Douglas, and Alphonso Trent; to incidents at Fort Hays, Brownsville, and Topeka; to defining moments in government, education, and the arts?this collection offers the first comprehensive overview of the black experience on the Plains.

Belonging to America


Belonging to America


$46.91


Who are the real citizens of America? Which people truly qualify for equality under the law? Two hundred years ago, an honest answer to these questions would have excluded not only women, slaves, and Indians, but also Germans, Scotch-Irish, Catholics, and Jews. Yet the Declaration of Independence expresses a profound commitment to the ideal of equal citizenship. Throughout their history Americans have simultaneously believed in equality and accepted the subordination of groups of people-and both views have been reflected in American law. In this lively and original book a leading constitutional law scholar shows how American law has both reflected and defined what it means to be an American, to belong to America. Kenneth L. Karst shows that the ideal of equal citizenship has long been a vital part of the culture of American public life, and tells a powerful story about how the idea of equality has developed in America, providing courtroom examples that range from Dred Scott to Brown versus Board of Education, from affimative action to gender discrimination, and from the treatment of American Indians to the status of Christianity. Karst explores the psychological impact of discrimination on those who have been its victims-who, in one way or another, have been told by society that they do not belong. And he argues that the principle of equal citizenship can and should guide the nations future just as it has shaped its past. *Author: Karst, Kenneth L. *Binding Type: Paperback *Number of Pages: 340 *Publication Date: 1991/01/23 *Language: English *Dimensions: 9.22 x 6.10 x 1.06 inches

Bound Away


Bound Away


$40.37


Bound Away offers a new understanding of the westward movement. After Frederick Jackson Turner’s thesis celebrating the frontier as the source of American freedom and democracy, and the iconoclasm of the new western historians who dismissed the idea of the frontier as merely a mask for conquest and exploitation, David Hackett Fischer and James C. Kelly take a third approach to the subject. They share with Turner the idea of the westward movement as a creative process of high importance in American history, but they understand it in a different way. Whereas Turner studied the westward movement in terms of its destination, Fischer and Kelly approach it in terms of its origins. Virginia’s long history enables them to provide a rich portrait of migration and expansion as a dynamic process that preserved strong cultural continuities. They suggest that the oxymoron bound away – from the folk song Shenandoah – captures a vital truth about American history. As people moved west, they built new societies from old materials, in a double-acting process that made America what it is today. Based on an acclaimed exhibition at the Virginia Historical Society, the book studies three stages of migration to, within, and from Virginia. Each stage has its own story to tell. Together they offer an opportunity to study the westward movement through three centuries, as it has rarely been studied before. Fischer and Kelly believe that the westward movement was a broad cultural process best understood not only through the writings of intellectual elites but also through the physical artifacts and folkways of ordinary people. The wealth of anecdotes and illustrations in this volume offers a new wayof looking at John Smith and William Byrd, George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, Daniel Boone, Dred Scott, and scores of lesser-known gentry, yeomen, servants, and slaves who were all bound away to an old new world.

Congress and the Crisis of the 1850s


Congress and the Crisis of the 1850s


$48.1


During the long decade from 1848 to 1861 America was like a train speeding down the track, without an engineer or brakes. The new territories acquired from Mexico had vastly increased the size of the nation, but debate over their status?and more importantly the status of slavery within them?paralyzed the nation. Southerners gained access to the territories and a draconian fugitive slave law in the Compromise of 1850, but this only exacerbated sectional tensions. Virtually all northerners, even those who supported the law because they believed that it would preserve the union, despised being turned into slave catchers. In 1854, in the Kansas-Nebraska Act, Congress repealed the ban on slavery in the remaining unorganized territories. In 1857, in the Dred Scottcase, the Supreme Court held that all bans on slavery in the territories were unconstitutional. Meanwhile, northern whites, free blacks, and fugitive slaves resisted the enforcement of the 1850 fugitive slave law. In Congress members carried weapons and Representative Preston Brooks assaulted Senator Charles Sumner with a cane, nearly killing him. This was the decade of the 1850s and these were the issues Congress grappled with. This volume of new essays examines many of these issues, helping us better understand the failure of political leadership in the decade that led to the Civil War.

Cortelco Handset-rd 006547-vm2-pak Repl Handset Re (handsetrd)


Cortelco Handset-rd 006547-vm2-pak Repl Handset Re (handsetrd)


$19.51


Product Description. Cortelco amplified handset- RedITTHANDSETRD. Color: Red. Manufacturer Part Number: 8900D-RED

Die and Stay Dead


Die and Stay Dead


$3.74


In Die and Stay Dead, Nicholas Kaufmann’s gripping sequel to Dying is My Business, A brutal murder in Greenwich village puts Trent and the Five-Pointed Star on the trail of Erickson Arkwright, the last surviving member of a doomsday cult. Back in the day, the Aeternis Tenebris cult thought the world would end on New Year’s Eve of 2000. When it didn’t, they decided to end it themselves by summoning Nahash-Dred, a powerful, terrifying demon known as the Destroyer of Worlds. But something went wrong. The demon massacred the cult, leaving Arkwright the sole survivor. Now, hiding somewhere in New York City with a new identity, Arkwright plans to summon the demon again and finish the job he started over a decade ago. As Trent rushes to locate a long-lost magical artifact that may be the only way to stop him, the clues begin to mount. Trent’s past and Arkwright’s might be linked somehow. And if they are, it means the truth of who Trent really is may lie buried in the twisted mind of a madman.

Dred


Dred


$43.94


Harriet Beecher Stowe’s second antislavery novel was written partly in response to the criticisms ofUncle Tom’s Cabin (1852) by both white Southerners and black abolitionists. InDred (1856), Stowe attempts to explore the issue of slavery from an African American perspective. Through the compelling stories of Nina Gordon, the mistress of a slave plantation, and Dred, a black revolutionary, Stowe brings to life conflicting beliefs about race, the institution of slavery, and the possibilities of violent resistance. Probing the political and spiritual goals that fuel Dred’s rebellion, Stowe creates a figure far different from the acquiescent Christian martyr Uncle Tom. In his introduction to the classic novel, Robert S. Levine outlines the antislavery debates in which Stowe had become deeply involved before and during her writing ofDred. Levine shows that in addition to its significance in literary history, the novel remains relevant to present-day discussions of cross-racial perspectives.

Dred and Harriet Scott


Dred and Harriet Scott


$16.72


The landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision Dred Scott v. Sandford, in which the slave Dred Scott was denied freedom for himself and his family, raised the ire of abolitionists and set the scene for the impending conflict between the northern and southern states. While most people have heard of the Dred Scott Decision, few know anything about the case’s namesake. In this meticulously researched and carefully crafted biography of Dred Scott, his wife, Harriet, and their daughters, Eliza and Lizzie, award-winning children’s book author Gwenyth Swain brings to life a family’s struggle to become free. Beginning with Dred’s childhood on a Virginia plantation and later travel with his masters to Alabama, Missouri, Illinois, and the territory that would become Minnesota, this family biography vividly depicts slave life in the early and mid-nineteenth century. At Fort Snelling, near St. Paul, Dred met and married Harriet, and together they traveled with their master to Florida and then Missouri, finally settling in St. Louis, where the Scotts were hired out for wages. There they began marshalling evidence to be used in their freedom suit, first submitted in 1846. Their case moved through local and state courts, finally reaching the U.S. Supreme Court in 1857. But the Court’s decision did not grant them the freedom they craved. Instead, it brought northern and southern states one step closer to the Civil War. How did one family’s dream of freedom become a cause of the Civil War? And how did that family finally leave behind the bonds of slavery? In Dred and Harriet Scott: A Family’s Struggle for Freedom, Swain looks at the Dred Scott Decision in a new and remarkably personal way. By followingthe story of the Scotts and their children, Swain crafts a unique biography of the people behind the famous court case. In the process, she makes the family’s journey through the court system and the ultimate decision of the Supreme Court understandable for readers of all ages. She also

Dred Prophecy


Dred Prophecy


$17.17


The Night Guard Legion fights to bring the Colt of Prophecy to the gathering at Beltain. The Valkyrien Centurie, led by Angelica and Alea, must weather an erupting volcano, the deadly Great Water, and fight the shadowy Followers of the Sun with lethal combat and psionic powers to accomplish their quest. *Author: Macphadrick, C.R. *Binding Type: Paperback *Number of Pages: 360 *Publication Date: 2008/05/23 *Language: English *Dimensions: 5.51 x 8.50 x 0.80 inches

Dred.I - Code Dred


Dred.I – Code Dred


$12.86


Dred.I – Code Dred

Dred; A Tale of the Great Dismal Swamp, Together with Anti-Slavery Tales and Papers,


Dred; A Tale of the Great Dismal Swamp, Together with Anti-Slavery Tales and Papers,


$39


This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts – the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.

emerginC D-Red Daytime Emulsion


emerginC D-Red Daytime Emulsion


$73


Buy emerginC Face Moisturizers – emerginC D-Red Daytime Emulsion 30ml/1oz

emerginC D-Red Nighttime Strengthening Balm


emerginC D-Red Nighttime Strengthening Balm


$72


Buy emerginC Face Moisturizers – emerginC D-Red Nighttime Strengthening Balm 50ml/1.7oz

Great Cases in Constitutional Law


Great Cases in Constitutional Law


$48.43


Slavery, segregation, abortion, workers’ rights, the power of the courts. These issues have been at the heart of the greatest constitutional controversies in American history. And in this concise and thought-provoking volume, some of today’s most distinguished legal scholars and commentators explain for a general audience how five landmark Supreme Court cases centered on those controversies shaped the country’s destiny and continue to affect us even now. The book is a profound exploration of the Supreme Court’s importance to America’s social and political life. It is also, as many of the contributors show, an intriguing reflection of what some have seen as an important trend in legal scholarship away from an uncritical belief in the essentially benign nature of judicial power. Robert George opens with an illuminating survey of the themes that unite and divide the five cases. Other contributors then examine each case in detail through a lively commentary-and-response format. Mark Tushnet and Jeremy Waldron exchange views on Marbury v. Madison, the pivotal 1803 case that established the power of the courts to invalidate legislation. Cass Sunstein and James McPherson discuss Dred Scott v. Sandford (1857), the notorious case that confirmed the rights of slave owners, declared that black people could not be American citizens, and is often seen as a cause of the Civil War. Hadley Arkes and Donald Drakeman explore the legacy of Lochner v. New York (1905), a case that ushered in decades of judicial hostility toward social welfare laws. Earl Maltz and Walter Murphy assess Brown v. Topeka Board of Education (1954), the famous case that ended racial segregation in public schools. Finally, JeanBethke Elshtain and George Will tackle Roe v. Wade (1973), still a flashpoint a quarter of a century later in the debate over abortion. While some of the contributors show sympathy for strong judicial interventions on social issues, many across the ideological spectrum are sharply criti

Havoc


Havoc


$12.22


The Conglomerate?s most dangerous convicts have made the prison ship Perdition their home. And they will defend it?Perdition is under siege. Mercenaries have boarded the station with orders to take control of the facility?and execute the prisoners. Their commander is offering full pardons to the first five inmates willing to help the mercs complete their mission. Dresdemona? Dred? Devos hasn?t survived hard time just to surrender to the Conglomerate?s armored thugs. Leading a ragtag army of inmates, Dred and her champion, Jael, wage a bloody guerilla war of chaos and carnage against impossible odds. But no matter how dire the outlook, the Dread Queen never backs down?

Historical and Legal Examination of That Part of the Decision of the Supreme Court of the United States in the Dred Scott Case: Which Declares the Unc


Historical and Legal Examination of That Part of the Decision of the Supreme Court of the United States in the Dred Scott Case: Which Declares the Unc


$21.85


This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

I, Dred Scott


I, Dred Scott


$11.03


Born into slavery in Virginia in the late 1700s, Dred Scott had little to look forward to in life. But he was fortunate in two ways: His first owner was fairly kind to him, and he grew up with his owner’s children, forming friendships that he would come to depend on years later. For on April 6, 1846, Dred Scott and his wife, Harriett – their ownership having changed hands several times during adulthood – took the dangerous and courageous step to sue for their freedom, entering into legal battles that would last for eleven years. During this time Dred Scott would need all the help and support he could get – from folks in the community all the way back to the people with whom he had been raised. With a foreword by Dred Scott’s great-grandson, Shelia P. Moses’ stunning story chronicles Dred Scott’s experiences as a slave, as a plaintiff in one of the most important legal cases in American history, and – at last – as a free man. Dred Scott’s story is one of tremendous courage and fierce determination. His is a life that should be known by – and should inspire – all Americans.

Justice Curtis In The Civil War Era


Justice Curtis In The Civil War Era


$55.62


During a career as both a lawyer and a Supreme Court justice, Benjamin R. Curtis addressed practically every major constitutional question of the mid-nineteenth century, making judgments that still resonate in American law. Aside from a family memoir written by his brother over one hundred years ago, however, no book-length treatment of Curtis exists. Now Stuart Streichler has filled this gap in judicial biography, using Curtis’s life and work as a window on the most serious constitutional crisis in American history, the Civil War. Curtis was the lead attorney for President Andrew Johnson in the Senate’s impeachment trial, where he delivered the pivotal argument, and his was an influential voice in the pervasive constitutional struggle between states and the federal government. He is best remembered, however, for dissenting in the Dred Scott case, in which he disputed Chief Justice Taney’s proslavery ruling that no black person could ever become a citizen of the United States. In the wake of the decision, Curtis resigned from the court, the only justice in the Supreme Court’s history to do so on grounds of principle. Yet he also clashed with Boston’s abolitionists over enforcing the Fugitive Slave Act, and he opposed the Emancipation Proclamation. In a period when the Constitution was radically transformed from a charter that protected slavery to one that granted all persons equal rights of citizenship. Justice Curtis maintained his faith in the Constitution as an adaptable instrument of self-government and tried to mark out a path for gradual change. Streichler assesses Curtis’s common-law methods in the context of his divisive times and shows how the judge’s views continue to shedlight on issues that have become once again relevant, such as the presidential impeachment process and, after 9/11, the use of military tribunals to try civilians.

Leapholes


Leapholes


$18.39


Ryan Coolidge hates middle school and is in the worst kind of trouble-trouble with the law. The one person who can help Ryan is a mysterious old lawyer named Hezekiah. Hezekiah may have magical powers, or he may have the most elaborate computerized law library ever conceived. Either way, together, Ryan and Hezekiah do their legal research by zooming through leapholes, physically entering the law books, and coming face-to-face with actual people from some of our nation’s most famous cases-like Rosa Parks and Dred Scott-who will help Ryan defend himself in court. It is time travel with a legal twist, where law books and important legal precedents come to life.

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