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White Girl Dreads

December 4th, 2012 admin Leave a comment Go to comments


“White People” Dreads



Appleblossom the Possum


Appleblossom the Possum


$6.49


Fans of E.B. White and Dick King-Smith will adore this heartwarming and funny animal adventure by the award-winning author ofCounting by 7s Mama has trained up her baby possums in the ways of their breed, and now it?s time for all of them?even little Appleblossom?to make their way in the world. Appleblossom knows the rules: she must never be seen during the day, and she must avoid cars, humans, and the dreaded hairies (sometimes known as dogs). Even so, Appleblossom decides to spy on a human family?and accidentally falls down their chimney! The curious Appleblossom, her faithful brothers?who launch a hilarious rescue mission?and even the little girl in the house have no idea how fascinating the big world can be. But they’re about to find out! With dynamic illustrations, a tight-knit family, and a glimpse at the world from a charming little marsupial’s point of view, this cozy animal story is a perfect read-aloud and a classic in the making.

Liongold: Sunlight and Shadows in the Era of Apartheid


Liongold: Sunlight and Shadows in the Era of Apartheid


$30.91


LIONGOLD is the poignant memoir of a white girl growing up in South Africa during the height of the apartheid regime. Sometimes gently ironic, at other times funny, sad or shocking, this book describes life in a beautiful place, at an ugly time in its history. Bea Alden grew up in Johannesburg, a tall city founded on a vast wealth of gold being mined day and night in deep underground shafts by an army of black laborers. Above and below ground, around the entire country, blacks did hard physical work on behalf of whites. Apartheid encouraged white families to employ black servants, and Bea’s parents saw no bias in this practice. In that place and time, it seemed quite normal. Her father’s mental illness was their secret shame, and the family lived in dread of it becoming known in their own white circle. In language rich with mood and atmosphere, delicately unfolding the intricate relationships of gender, class, ethnicity and race, LIONGOLD tells the story of one family, their tragic problems, and an entire way of life doomed, necessarily, to give way to immense change.

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